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Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors Tumor Tissue Bank
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Colaborator
 
Shiro Miura, Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology, Nagasaki Medical Center
Shiro Miura
(Department of Pathology, Nagasaki Medical Center)
Title & Licence : - Medical license (M.D.), 2003
- Doctor of Medicine (Ph.D) 2008
- Board Certified Pathologist of the Japanese Society of Pathology
Special field : - Human pathology
- Experimental Pathology
- Radiation life sciences
Educational
background :
- Nagasaki University School of Medicine
- Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Graduate School
Work
experience :
- Nagasaki University Hospital resident, 2002
- Researcher(postdoc), Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 2008
- Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 2010
- Lecturer, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 2014
Academic
Society :
- The Japanese Society of Pathology
- Japanese Society of Clinical Cytology
- The Japan Radiation Research Society
- Japan Endocrine Pathology Society
Awards: - 50th Japan Radiation Research Society Excellent Presentation Award
My main research object is to understand the late health effect of radiation at molecular pathologic level. The incidence of several types of leukemia peaked during the 5 to 10 year period after the A-bomb explosions. Meanwhile, an increased risk of solid cancer has continued for decades, and the incidence of certain types of cancer still is higher than the incidence in controlled populations.
My recent study demonstrated the association of HER-2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers among A-bomb survivors with radiation exposure(Miura S, et al., Cancer 2008). Gene amplification is an important mechanism for oncogene overexpression in solid tumors and also serves as an indicator of genomic instability (GIN). Ionizing radiation effectively induces several DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a dose-dependent manner, inducing a GIN. DSBs are repaired through error-prone, nonhomologous end joining; singlestrand annealing; and/or error-free, homologous recombination. Although most DNA damage is repaired correctly, it is well established that the repair process disrupts the genomic structure, which may manifest as induction of a mutation, gross rearrangement of chromatin, and promotion of tumorigenesis through the development of oncogene amplification. A-bomb radiation may induce minor disruptions of the genomic structures, which may result in GIN for an extended period in mammary glands and, subsequently, may affect oncogene amplification during breast carcinogenesis in the survivors.
 I have established the tissue bank for solid cancers which were freshly resected from A-bomb survivors together with information on the A-bombing and medical data since April 2008. The establishment of A-bomb survivor’s tissue bank will enhance the global collaboration and contribute to understand the late health effects of radiation at molecular level, finding a key to the prediction, prevention and treatment of carcinogenesis as a late radiation effect.


Tomomi Kurashige, Assistant Professor (Department of Molecular Medicine)
Department of Molecular Medicine
Tomomi Kurashige, Assistant Professor
(Department of Molecular Medicine)
Title & Licence : Ph.D.
Special field : - Experimental pathology
- Radiation life sciences
Academic
Society :
- Japan Society of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry
- Japan Endocrine Pathology Society
- The Japanese Society of Pathology


Ryota Otsubo, Assistant Professor (Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Translational Medical Sciences)
Department of Surgical Oncology
Ryota Otsubo, Assistant Professor
(Department of Surgical Oncology)
Title & Licence : M.D., Ph.D.
Board Certified Surgeon
Special field : - Breast Surgery
- Endocrine Surgery
Academic
Society :
- Japan Surgical Society
- Japan Surgical Association
- The Japanese Breast Cancer Society
- Japan Association of Breast Cancer Screening
- Japanese Society of Thyroid Surgery
- The Japan Society of Human Genetics
- The Japanese Society of Pathology
(1) Novel diagnostic procedure for determining metastasis to sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer using a semi-dry dot-blot (SDB) method.
Accurate assessment of metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) is important for deciding whether to remove axillary lymph nodes and providing appropriate treatment for patients. However, new diagnostic methods are required because there is a heavy workload for pathologists, and current methods have high false-negative rates and low sensitivity, and are expensive. Recently, we developed a “semi-dry dot-blot (SDB)” procedure, which visualizes the presence of cancer cells in the lavage fluid of sectioned lymph nodes by anti-pancytokeratin antibody (AE1/AE3) and chromogen on a dot-blot membrane. This method is based on the simple principle that there is usually no epithelial component in the lymph node if cancer does not develop into metastasis to the lymph node. We evaluated the validity and efficacy of the SDB method for the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in a clinical setting.
  To evaluate the efficacy of the SDB method in sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, 174 SLNs from 100 cases of clinically node-negative breast cancer were analyzed. Each SLN was longitudinally sliced at 2-mm intervals and the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and time required for the SDB method were determined and compared with the permanent  pathology report. Metastasis was detected in 15 SLNs (8.6%), and the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and mean required time of the SDB method were 93.3%, 96.9%, 96.6%, and 43.3 minutes, respectively. The cost for two SLN analyses by the SDB method was approximately 10 USD, which included cutting blades, primary and secondary antibodies, chromogen, filter, absorption paper, and dot-blot membrane. Special equipment was not necessary, but a centrifuge and micropipette were required.
The SDB method is simple, accurate, cost-effective, and feasible for the intraoperative diagnosis of SLN metastasis without the loss of lymph node tissue, and it enables a simultaneous pathological investigation and application to other cancers. We plan to develop a kit product, which will contribute to cost reduction for the detection of SLN metastasis.

(2) Preoperative diagnosis of thyroid follicular carcinoma using genomic instability
 Thyroid follicular carcinomas are diagnosed by postoperative pathological diagnosis with views of capsule invasion, vascular invasion, or metastasis to other organ. Thus, it is difficult to diagnose preoperatively by fine-needle aspiration cytology. P53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) is one of nuclear proteins, that seems to reflect genomic instability of thyroid tumors. We already evaluated immunofluorescence analysis of 53BP1 expression in follicular carcinoma and follicular adenoma, and are trying to apply this result to the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid follicular tumors.


 
Nagasaki Harbor Medical Center
Hiroyuki Yajima
Nagasaki Harbor Medical Center
(Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology)
Title & Licence : M.D., Ph.D.
Board Certified Member of the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine, Board Certified Gastroenterologist of the Japanse Society of Gastroenterology, Board Certified Member of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society
Special field : - Gastrointestinal medicine
Academic
Society :
- The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine
- The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology
- The Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society
- The Japanese Gastroenterological Association


Hideo Wada,
Ureshino Medical Center
Hideo Wada
Ureshino Medical Center(Department of Surgery)
Title & Licence : M.D., Board Certified Surgeon
Special field : - Gastroenterological Surgery
Educational
background :
- Graduation of Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 2005
Academic
Society :
- Japan Surgical Society
- The Japanese Society of Gastroenterological Surgery
- Japan Surgical Association
- Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine
- Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery
- The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology
The molecular pathological analysis of neuroendocrine tumors in multiple organs


Keiichi Hashiguchi
Assistant Professor
Keiichi Hashiguchi, Assistant Professor
(Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology)
Title & Licence : M.D., Ph.D
Board Certified Member of the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine, Board Certified
 Gastroenterologist of the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology, Board Certified Member of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society
Special field : - Gastrointestinal medicine
Academic
Society :
- The Japanese Society of Internal  Medicine
- The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology
- The Japan Gastroenterological  Endoscopy Society


 
Assistant Professor
Nozomi Ueki, Assistant Professor
(Regional Pathological Diagnosis Support Center)
Title & Licence : Ph.D.
Special field : -Human Pathology
Educational
background :
-Graduation of Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 2012
-Graduation of Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 2020
Work
experiment :
-Resident, Nagasaki University Hospital, 2012
-Assistant Professor, Nagasaki University Hospital, 2020
Academic
Society :
- The Japanese Society of Pathology
- The Japanese Society of Clinical Cytology




































 
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